tuftears: Thoughtful Lynx (Thoughtful)
[personal profile] tuftears
Thanks to confusingly European-named sleeping drugs (Zolpidem, known as Ambien in the States) I was able to get another 5 hours of sleep or so. We got up a bit early and greeted the dawn.



Sunrise over the Aeolian islands! The paper we got the previous afternoon told us "The seven Aeolian Islands consist of Lipari, Vulcano, Salina, Panarea, Filicudi, Alicudi, and Stomboli. Geologically, these beautiful islands are quite rugged, with deep caverns, steep cliffs, and splendid views. The volcano on Stromboli erupts quite frequently."




More scenic isles! It's going to be a great day out.





And that must be Lipari up there! We were getting in close in order to anchor, but we weren't actually going to dock; there either wasn't a dock big enough or it was already booked, so they were going to use Zodiacs to bring us in. I was a bit nervous about this prospect.




I fortified myself with an omelette, a hash brown bite, BACON, and... a fellow tourist quizzed me about that off-white stuff on my plate. "It's oatmeal!" I revealed. I was in the mood for something basic to cut the edge on the grease and salt and fat. With a bit of apricot jelly mixed in, the oatmeal was just purrfect.



Dracosphynx snapped this picture of me going for another breakfast pastry. Hey, I'm finally getting sleep, I need some nutrients now that I'm up and around. x_x



Here I am, equipped for the Zodiac! We all wore these; the pilot got a distinct black life-jacket to mark him as the 'captain' of the boat, as it were.




I didn't enjoy the Zodiac ride much; too busy holding on and trying to make sure neither I nor any of my possessions fell into the water. -_-



We made it successfully! Here's the port of Lipari. Note the ruggedly handsome fortress watching over the port. Malfeasants shall be unmercifully pummeled from the battlements!



A view of the other side of the port.



We strolled up this street toward where the tour buses were parked; the port where we had pulled up was too small for that level of vehicular commerce.



We passed by this display of clay replicas of ancient Greek deities and figures. Each of us received one of these later as a free souvenir of our trip to Italy.



On the bus! We climbed the slope, winding back and forth. The back-and-forth meant that each side of the bus got its chance to take nice pictures of the landscape; I managed to get this relatively nice picture of the port of Lipari across the bus.




We got up to a nice spot for photography and pawsed to look over the landscape! There was also a wine tasting; I declined any but Dracosphynx had some and was pleasantly pleased by one of the vintages on offer.






On our way to the Archaeological Museum!





Partially transcribed: "20170612_111310
THE ROCK OF LIPARI FROM PREHISTORIC TIMES TO THE ROMAN AGE

The sides of the rock rise vertically from the sea making the upper part very difficult to reach. The upper surface is quite flat. Thanks to this geological formation the rock has been a real natural fortress offering to ancient peoples a place of safety. It has been inhabited since the Neolithic period (about six thousand years ago) to the present day. In 1950 archaeological excavations were made and these have made it possible to re-construct 10 metres of cultural stratigraphy.

The most amazing discovery was the over-lying and intersected remains of the huts of four villages, which followed one after the other for the entire period of the Bronze age, that is over one thousand years of history. The huts are usually oval in shape, small (the maximum length being about 5 metres) and built of local stones and earth, very close to one another, this was probably due to the limited space on the plain of the acropolis. The walls were constructed of dry stone. The roofs were conical in shape made of branches of broom, while the floors were in flattened ground or covered in clay."




Partially transcribed: "Milazzo in the Prehistoric and Classical Ages

The combination of a series of particularly favourable geographical conditions made Milazzo in ancient times one of the most suitable sites for human settlement.

An isolated, triangular rock with precipitous cliffs on two sides and a steep slope on the third side provided, like the "Castello" of Lipari, a veritable natural fortress which could easily be defended.
It was this bastion, totally dominated by the Norman, Swabian, and Aragonese castle and surrounded at its base on the less rocky side by solid XVI century walls, that made Milazzo one of the principal military bases for the Spanish domination of Sicily.

...

Some bowls in the Aeolian style of Capo Graziano, found sporadically during the excavation of the Greek necropolis on the isthmus, could in fact belong to cremation tombs like those in the necropolis of the same age of Contrada Diana in Lipari.

Certainly related to the Capo Graziano period (XIX? - XV century B.C.) is the necropolis with burials in large jars (enchytrismos) of San Papino on the western shore of the Isthmus (the finds are in the Museum of Syracuse), but this bears no analogy with the Aeolian Capo Graziano facies and is rather linked to similar finds in Messina (Vale Boccetta) and Naxos. It could therefore be referred to the cultural facies of Rodi-Tindari in Northern Sicily, even though the rite of enchytrismos (probably under tumuli) is obviously of Aegean origin."




Partially transcribed: "The Artemision of Mylal

The Artemision, one of the most famous sanctuaries of Ancient Sicily, was certainly connected with the great importance that Milazzo enjoyed from the Bronze Age onwards.

...

To this shore of Thrinakle (that is, of Sicily) came the ship of Ulysses, fleeing from Scilla and Charybdis, the monsters guarding the Straits. Ulysses was obliged to remain here for more than a month on account of the unfavourable winds.

Food began to run low and Ulysses's companions, driven on by hunger, seized the opportunity while he was sleeping to kill and eat the finest of the Cows of the Sun. This provoked the anger of Apollo, who begged Zeus for revenge. So it was that when the ship was finally able to depart, it was caught in a storm and struck by a lightning bolt hurled by Zeus. Ulysses, the only survivor, clinging on to the wreckage, was once more obliged to face the monsters of the Straits."






Ancient pots!



Ancient tablets!



There's Dracosphynx, taking pictures of the coffins.




Ancient necropolis! I think the sign is fairly legible, so no need to transcribe it.



We had a nice pleasant walk from there to the Lipari Cathedral.



Another beautiful nave!



In America, this would be totally over the top. Here, I nod wisely. It's not a bad amount of bling for cathedrals.



To be honest, I've forgotten why I took a picture of this. I'm pretty sure it's one of those memorial markers.



A cat in the cat-hedral! Yay! ^_^



Back in Port Lipari, I take a picture of this because, there is a cat. No other explanation is needed.



Lunch! There was an option to have "catch of the day" on the ship, but we opted to have lunch off-shore instead. This is spaghetti bolognese, Italian style, with grilled eggplant. Note that once again, the noodles are distinctly thicker than the American standard, and also "al dente". Better bread, though! The eggplant wasn't as good as the one in Erice, alas.



We headed back on the ship, just in time to get some of the dessert from lunch! Which was, in this case, ice cream, a scoop of vanilla and a scoop of strawberry, with chocolate sauce drizzled on top. Yum!



Dracosphynx gives me a slightly "Ohhh-kaaay?" look, in front of the fortress of Lipari.



Here I am raising a glass in a toast on the deck of the Le Ponant.




The volcano of Stromboli! Rather than stay anchored in Lipari-- there may have been a fee for that, Dracosphynx mused-- we were making for Stromboli where we would be circling until later in the evening, and there was an option to get on one of the zodiacs and take pictures of the Le Ponant under full sail. Dracosphynx and I opted to stay on board.



The Le Ponant with sails up, taken from the topmost deck.



Fancy drinks! I believe these are some sort of smoothies. They were pretty decent but not life-changing.



Dinner! We had it on the upper restaurant this time, out on the balcony open to the stars.



The sun was setting, dramatically lighting Stromboli.



Sunset.



The veal. It was supposedly 'stuffed' but neither Dracosphynx nor I could determine with what-- to all appearance they were simply pieces of admittedly tender and tasty meat.



Crepe suzette! For being a mess of a real thin pancake swirled with orange sauce and a mango sherbet, it was quite tasty.




Here, you can see Stromboli puffing smoke.





And there's Stromboli belching a bit of fire!

Following that, we retired to bed, where it was a bit of applesauce and a sleeping pill for me, to ensure I could sleep through the ship's departure to Amalfi for the following day.
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tuftears: Lynx Wynx (Default)
Conrad "Lynx" Wong

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